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Fall 2013 Class Offerings

At a glance . . .                                                                   

Class Time Location Professor
ENG-101H-01        T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Berger
ENG-281H-51
M/ 5:20-7:50     TBA Radetich
HIS-101H-01
T/TH 2:00-3:15 TBA Gennari
HIS-101H-02
M/W11:00-12:15 TBA Roberson
MTH-117H-01
M/W 2:00-3:15     TBA Echeverria
MTH-140H-01 M/W 11:00-12:40 TBA Monticelli
MUS-101H-01 M/W 1:00-2:15 TBA Billingsley
PHL-131H-90 T 5:20-7:50 – CAMDEN TBA Hoheisel
POL-101H-51 M 5:20-7:50 TBA Hughes
PSY-101H-01 T/TH 9:30-10:45   TBA Colbert

Details...

ENG 101H – Honors English Composition IThis course is required for nearly every degree program at CCC, but it could be a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective, if not required for your program.

ENG 281H – Honors American Literature IThis course can be used as a Literature General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, Liberal Arts Elective or Free Elective.

HIS 101H – Honors World Civilization I.  This course can be used as a History General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, a Diversity Elective or a Free Elective.

MTH 117H – Honors Explorations in Mathematical Thought.  This course can be used as a Mathematics General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective. This course is for non-majors, and the description is as follows:  This is a general education mathematics course in which students are exposed to basic concepts and principles in the philosophy of mathematics and mathematical logic; including set theory; axiomatic systems and algebraic structures; the concept of infinity; number theory; and proof; among other topics.  This course is for the student earning an AA or majoring in Liberal Arts; it is not intended for students majoring in mathematics/science.  As you can see, this is a philosophical approach to mathematics, so is very different from the other math courses you might have taken.  You can contact Professor Echeverria if you would like to see the reading list (the fact that there is a reading/film list for the class, already shows how different the approach will be).

MTH 140H – Honors Calculus. This course can be used as a Mathematics General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

MUS 101H – Honors Music Appreciation.  This course can be used as an Art General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

PHL 131H – Honors Introduction to Ethics.  This course can be used as an Ethics General Education Elective, a Philosophy General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, A Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

POL 101H – Honors Introduction to Political ScienceThis course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.

PSY 101H – Honors Basic Psychology.  This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.


Spring 2013 Class Offerings

At a glance . . .                                                                   

Class Time Location Professor
CHM 140H-01           T/TH 8:00-10:30 a.m. TBA Mao
CSC 102H-02
M/W 12:30-1:45 TBA Wright
ENG 102H-01
T/TH 9:30-10:45 TBA Berger
ENG 102H-02
T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Berger
ENG 271H-01
T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Raftery
FLM 201H-01 T/TH 2:00-3:15 TBA Murray
HIS 101H-01 M/W/F 10:00-10:50 TBA Roberson
PHL 232H-01 T/TH 9:30-10:45 TBA Hoheisel
SOC 101H-01 T/TH 12:30-1:45 TBA Samara
SPE 102H-01 T/TH 2:00-3:15 TBA Green

Details...

CSC 102H: Honors Information Literacy in a Digital Age The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), released five Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. This course is designed to provide the basic computer skills necessary to support the course goal of meeting the ACRL's five standards which are to determine the nature and extent of the information needed, to access needed information effectively and efficiently, to evaluate information and its sources critically, to use the information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose and to use the information ethically and legally. In turn, accomplishing these goals will enhance lifelong learning, the ability to think critically and the use of information for problem solving and decision making.
*** (Technology General Education Elective)

CHM 140H: Honors Chemistry and Society This course is designed for non-science majors. The course will present some of the fundamental concepts of chemistry, and introduce students to laboratory experimentation. Interesting chemistry topics will be considered with regard to their social, environmental, and economic issues. Discussion topics may include: air pollution, the ozone layer and the impact of technology on global warming; alternative energy sources, such as solar, nuclear and biomass processes; water pollution; nutrition; the mechanism of action of various drugs, and other topics based on student interest and instructor expertise.
*** (Lab Science and Science General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

ENG 102H: Honors English Composition II English Composition 102, the second semester of a two-semester general education course, develops the student's ability to read and write, building on the foundation of English Composition 101. To this end, it begins with a review of the subject matter and terminology taught in English Composition 101—a rapid and rigorous review, neither an attempt to re-teach subject matter nor an exercise in teaching elementary editing skills—to prepare the student for the more challenging reading and writing of English Composition 102. The reading assignments represent the best writing in English, both in the quality of the writing and in the quality and complexity of content. All writing assignments are based on these readings. The course stresses argumentative writing and grounds the student in the rhetoric of argumentation. It also develops the student's research skills and ability to use source material.
*** (Required for almost every degree we offer)

ENG 271H: Honors World Literature Students study masterpieces of world civilization representative of various epochs, nationalities, and literary genres from ancient time from the seventeenth century. The course explores the relationship between people to their world and their deities in such works as Homer, Sophocles, Shonagon, Dante, LiPo, Jiang Fang, Zeimi, Cervantes, and Shakespeare.
*** (Diversity, Literature and Humanities General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

FLM 201H: Honors Film Appreciation Film Appreciation is a basic survey aiming to acquaint the student with the art of the form. The focus is on the narrative or story film and the approach is analytical rather than historical. Having completed the course a student should find that she/he has greater insight into the creating of films and a greater appreciation of that which is good in films. A more insightful film-goer should be a more demanding patron. A more discerning film-going public may encourage more discerning film-making and that, perhaps, should be the focus of a film appreciation course.
*** (Humanities and Arts General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

HIS 101H: Honors World Civilization I An introduction to the major cultures of the world from the ancient period to c.800 C.E. in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, this course will analyze these cultures in their political, economic, and religious aspects, and will also reflect the latest information on the role of women in society. The objectives of this course are to give students a greater understanding of why the world is the way it is today, to develop within the students the necessary skills to analyze both contemporary and historical societies and their institutional components, and to cultivate an awareness of foreign cultures and societies in order to give new perspectives on our own cultural assumptions and traditions. This course should not be taken by students who have taken HIS-111, Western Civilization.
*** (History, Humanities and Diversity General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

PHL 232H: Honors Biomedical Ethics The first third of the course will be devoted to an historical study of the way in which several ethical theories have attempted to answer the question of how we can determine what we ought to do – i.e., what does it mean to "do the right thing"? The remainder of the course will be spent reading and analyzing articles which present differing views about what we should or should not do with respect to difficult situations in biomedical ethics. For example: is euthanasia ever permissible? Does a dental hygienist have a duty to treat a person who is in pain but who has no dental insurance? Should a nurse treat a critically ill patient who, because of illness, is unable to give consent for a procedure? Should animals be used for medical research? What is the appropriate use for genetic information about an individual? As we address these and other similar issues, emphasis will be placed on close reading of the text and on class discussion.
*** (Ethics General Education Elective; Liberal Arts and Philosophy Elective)

SOC 101H: Honors Introduction to Sociology This course is designed to help students understand and think about the behavior of people in groups, with emphasis on mastery of fundamental sociological concepts and an introduction to systematic social analysis. The course may consider newer sociological developments, culture and socialization, social organization, social classes, collective behavior, population, urbanization, and social change.
*** (Social Science General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

SPE 102H: Honors Public Speaking Public Speaking introduces the principles and techniques of formal communication. Attention will be given to speaker - listener relationships, management and choice of ideas, selection and organization of materials, and use of language and nonverbal elements. Particular attention will be paid to the principles and skills of persuasion and delivery skills as well as audience analysis. Formal presentations will be required.
*** (Required for all AA degrees; Liberal Arts Elective)


Fall 2012 Class Offerings

At a glance . . .                                                                   

Class Time Location Professor
ENG-101H-01 T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Berger
ENG-281H-51
M 5:20-7:50 TBA Radetich
HIS 101H-01
T/TH 2:00-3:15 TBA Gennari
MTH 117H-01
M/W 2:00-3:15 TBA Echeverria
MTH 140H-01
M/W 11:00-12:40 TBA Tecle
MUS 101H-01 M/W 1:00-2:15  TBA Billingsley
PHL-131-H-90  T 5:20-7:50 – CAMDEN TBA Hoheisel
POL-101H-51 M 5:20-7:50 TBA Hughes
PSY-101H-01 T/TH 9:30-10:45  TBA Colbert

Details . . .
ENG 101H – Honors English Composition I.  This course is required for nearly every degree program at CCC, but it could be a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective, if not required for your program.

ENG 281H – Honors American Literature I.  This course can be used as a Literature General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, Liberal Arts Elective or Free Elective.

HIS 101H – Honors World Civilization I.  This course can be used as a History General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, a Diversity Elective or a Free Elective.

MTH 117H – Honors Explorations in Mathematical Thought.  This course can be used as a Mathematics General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective. This course is for non-majors, and the description is as follows:  This is a general education mathematics course in which students are exposed to basic concepts and principles in the philosophy of mathematics and mathematical logic; including set theory; axiomatic systems and algebraic structures; the concept of infinity; number theory; and proof; among other topics.  This course is for the student earning an AA or majoring in Liberal Arts; it is not intended for students majoring in mathematics/science.  As you can see, this is a philosophical approach to mathematics, so is very different from the other math courses you might have taken.  You can contact Professor Echeverria if you would like to see the reading list (the fact that there is a reading/film list for the class, already shows how different the approach will be).

MTH 140H – Honors Calculus. This course can be used as a Mathematics General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

MUS 101H – Honors Music Appreciation.  This course can be used as an Art General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

PHL 131H – Honors Introduction to Ethics.  This course can be used as an Ethics General Education Elective, a Philosophy General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, A Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

POL 101H – Honors Introduction to Political Science.  This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.

PSY 101H – Honors Basic Psychology.  This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.


Spring 2012 Class Offerings

At a glance . . .                                                                   

Class Time Location Professor
CHM 140H-01 T/TH 8:00-10:30 a.m. TBA Mao
CSC 102H-02
M/W 12:30-1:45 TBA Wright
ENG 102H-01
T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Berger
ENG 102H-02
M/W 2:00-3:15 TBA Berger
ENG 271H-01
T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Raftery
FLM 201H-01 T/TH 2:00-3:15 TBA Murray
HIS 101H-01 M/W/F 9:00-9:50 TBA Roberson
PHL 232H-01 T/TH 9:30-10:45 TBA Hoheisel
SOC 101H-01 T/TH 12:30-1:45 TBA Samara

Details . . .

CSC 102H: Honors Information Literacy in a Digital Age The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), released five Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. This course is designed to provide the basic computer skills necessary to support the course goal of meeting the ACRL's five standards which are to determine the nature and extent of the information needed, to access needed information effectively and efficiently, to evaluate information and its sources critically, to use the information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose and to use the information ethically and legally. In turn, accomplishing these goals will enhance lifelong learning, the ability to think critically and the use of information for problem solving and decision making.
*** (Technology General Education Elective)

CHM 140H: Honors Chemistry and Society This course is designed for non-science majors. The course will present some of the fundamental concepts of chemistry, and introduce students to laboratory experimentation. Interesting chemistry topics will be considered with regard to their social, environmental, and economic issues.
Discussion topics may include: air pollution, the ozone layer and the impact of technology on global warming; alternative energy sources, such as solar, nuclear and biomass processes; water pollution; nutrition; the mechanism of action of various drugs, and other topics based on student interest and instructor expertise.
*** (Lab Science and Science General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

ENG 102H: Honors English Composition II English Composition 102, the second semester of a two-semester general education course, develops the student's ability to read and write, building on the foundation of English Composition 101. To this end, it begins with a review of the subject matter and terminology taught in English Composition 101—a rapid and rigorous review, neither an attempt to re-teach subject matter nor an exercise in teaching elementary editing skills—to prepare the student for the more challenging reading and writing of English Composition 102. The reading assignments represent the best writing in English, both in the quality of the writing and in the quality and complexity of content. All writing assignments are based on these readings. The course stresses argumentative writing and grounds the student in the rhetoric of argumentation. It also develops the student's research skills and ability to use source material.
*** (Required for almost every degree we offer)

ENG 271H: Honors World Literature Students study masterpieces of world civilization representative of various epochs, nationalities, and literary genres from ancient time from the seventeenth century. The course explores the relationship between people to their world and their deities in such works as Homer, Sophocles, Shonagon, Dante, LiPo, Jiang Fang, Zeimi, Cervantes, and Shakespeare.
*** (Diversity, Literature and Humanities General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

FLM 201H: Honors Film Appreciation Film Appreciation is a basic survey aiming to acquaint the student with the art of the form. The focus is on the narrative or story film and the approach is analytical rather than historical. Having completed the course a student should find that she/he has greater insight into the creating of films and a greater appreciation of that which is good in films. A more insightful film-goer should be a more demanding patron. A more discerning film-going public may encourage more discerning film-making and that, perhaps, should be the focus of a film appreciation course.
*** (Humanities and Arts General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

HIS 101H: Honors World Civilization I An introduction to the major cultures of the world from the ancient period to c.800 C.E. in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, this course will analyze these cultures in their political, economic, and religious aspects, and will also reflect the latest information on the role of women in society. The objectives of this course are to give students a greater understanding of why the world is the way it is today, to develop within the students the necessary skills to analyze both contemporary and historical societies and their institutional components, and to cultivate an awareness of foreign cultures and societies in order to give new perspectives on our own cultural assumptions and traditions. This course should not be taken by students who have taken HIS-111, Western Civilization.
*** (History, Humanities and Diversity General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)

PHL 232H: Honors Biomedical Ethics The first third of the course will be devoted to an historical study of the way in which several ethical theories have attempted to answer the question of how we can determine what we ought to do – i.e., what does it mean to "do the right thing"? The remainder of the course will be spent reading and analyzing articles which present differing views about what we should or should not do with respect to difficult situations in biomedical ethics. For example: is euthanasia ever permissible? Does a dental hygienist have a duty to treat a person who is in pain but who has no dental insurance? Should a nurse treat a critically ill patient who, because of illness, is unable to give consent for a procedure? Should animals be used for medical research? What is the appropriate use for genetic information about an individual? As we address these and other similar issues, emphasis will be placed on close reading of the text and on class discussion.
*** (Ethics General Education Elective; Liberal Arts and Philosophy Elective)

SOC 101H: Honors Introduction to Sociology This course is designed to help students understand and think about the behavior of people in groups, with emphasis on mastery of fundamental sociological concepts and an introduction to systematic social analysis. The course may consider newer sociological developments, culture and socialization, social organization, social classes, collective behavior, population, urbanization, and social change.
*** (Social Science General Education Elective; Liberal Arts Elective)


Fall 2011 Class Offerings

At a glance . . .                                                                   

Class Time Location Professor
ENG 101H T/TH 11:00-12:15 TBA Berger
ENG 281H
M 5:20-7:50 TBA Radetich
HIS 101H
T/TH 2:00-3:15 TBA Gennari
MTH 117H
M/W 2:00-3:15 TBA Echeverria
MTH 140H
M/W 11:00-12:40 TBA Echeverria
MUS 101H M/W/F 8:00-8:50  TBA Billingsley
POL 101H M 5:20-7:50   TBA Hughes
PSY 101H  T/TH 9:30-10:45 TBA Colbert

Details . . .
ENG 101H – Honors English Composition I. 
This course is required for nearly every degree program at CCC, but it could be a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective, if not required for your program.

ENG 281H – Honors American Literature I. 
This course can be used as a Literature General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, Liberal Arts Elective or Free Elective.

HIS 101H – Honors World Civilization I. 
This course can be used as a History General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, a Diversity Elective or a Free Elective.

MTH 117H – Honors Explorations in Mathematical Thought. 
This course can be used as a Mathematics General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.  This is a new course for the college, and Professor Echeverria is very excited about it.  This course is for non-majors, and the description is as follows:  This is a general education mathematics course in which students are exposed to basic concepts and principles in the philosophy of mathematics and mathematical logic; including set theory; axiomatic systems and algebraic structures; the concept of infinity; number theory; and proof; among other topics.  This course is for the student earning an AA or majoring in Liberal Arts; it is not intended for students majoring in mathematics/science.  As you can see, this is a philosophical approach to mathematics, so is very different from the other math courses you might have taken.  You can contact Professor Echeverria if you would like to see the reading list (the fact that there is a reading/film list for the class, already shows how different the approach will be).

MTH 140H – Honors Calculus.
This course can be used as a Mathematics General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

MUS 101H – Honors Music Appreciation I.  
This course can be used as an Art General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

POL 101H – Honors Introduction to Political Science. 
This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.

PSY 101H – Honors Basic Psychology.  
This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.


Spring 2011 Class Offerings

Class Time Location Professor
CHM-140H-01
Chemistry & Society
T/TH 8am to 10:30am TBA Choi
ENG-102H-01
English Composition II
T/TH 9:30am to 10:45am TBA Berger
ENG-102H-02
English Composition II
T/TH 11am to 12:15pm TBA Berger
ENG-271H-01
World Literature I
T/TH 11am to 12:15pm TBA Raftery
HIS-102H-01
World Civilization II

M/W/F 11am to 11:50am TBA Gennari
PHL-232H-01
Biomedical Ethics
T/TH 9:30am to 10:45am TBA Hoheiser

Details . . .

CHM 140H-01:  Chemistry & Society. Lab Science and Science Gen Ed Elective.

ENG 102H-01:  English Composition II. Required for almost every degree we offer.

ENG 102H-02:  English Composition II. Required for almost every degree we offer.

ENG 271H-01:  World Literature I. Diversity  and Humanities Gen Ed Elective.

HIS 102H-01:  World Civilization II. History, Diversity and Humanities Gen Ed Elective.

PHL 232H-01:  Biomedical Ethics. Ethics Gen Ed Elective, Philosophy Elective.


Fall 2010 Class Offerings

Class Time Location Professor
ENG 101H-01
Honors English Composition I
T/TH 11am to 12:15pm TBA Berger
HIS 101H-01
Honors World Civilization I
T/TH 2pm to 3:15pm TBA Gennari
MUS-101H-01
Honors Music Appreciation I
M/W/F 8am to 8:50am TBA Billingsly
POL-101H-52
Honors Introduction to Political Science
M 5:20pm to 7:50pm TBA Hughes
PSY-101H-01
Honors Basic Psychology


T/TH 9:30am to 10:45am TBA Colbert

Details . . .

ENG 101H – Honors English Composition I. 
This course is required for nearly every degree program at CCC, but it could be a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective, if not required for your program.

HIS 101H – Honors World Civilization I. 
This course can be used as a History General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, a Diversity Elective or a Free Elective.

MUS 101H – Honors Music Appreciation I. 
This course can be used as an Art General Education Elective, a Humanities General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective or a Free Elective.

POL 101H – Honors Introduction to Political Science. 
This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.

PSY 101H – Honors Basic Psychology.  
This course can be used as a Social Science General Education Elective, a Liberal Arts Elective, or a Free Elective.


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