New Courses

New Courses not currently printed in the 2014 Academic Program Guide

American Sign Language

ASL-200 ASL Essentials (3.00 cr.)
The course is an intensive overview of American Sign Language through the use of conversations. The student will focus vocabulary, classifiers, role shifting, spatial relationships, indicating verbs, the formation of signs, non-manual signals and sentence structure.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: ASL-102
Corequisite courses: ASL-201


Computer Information Systems

CIS-210 Information Systems Concepts (3.00 cr.)
Today, information systems are an integral part of all business activities and careers. This course introduces the students to contemporary information systems and demonstrates how these systems are used throughout organizations. The focus will be on the key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and telecommunications, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. Ethics and security protection relating to the use of information technology will be explained. In addition to surveying the exciting topic of information systems, students will gain hands-on experience with business software tools commonly applied to business data analysis and database management as well as business process execution. As a result, students will obtain valuable information technology knowledge and skills for being successful in all areas of business.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: ENG-101, MTH-114; and CSC-101, CIS-101 or CIS-206



CIS-225 Project Management Essentials (3.00 cr.)
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to plan and manage projects using Microsoft Project. MS Project is a powerful tool for project design and development. It documents the project from start to completion using tools to track the project schedules, costs and risks. The goal is for the student to learn and apply the basic usages of these tools preparing the way for more advanced topics, such as Project Management.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: CSC-101, CIS-101 or CIS-206



CIS-235 SQL Fundamentals I (3.00 cr.)
Relational databases often drive company-critical and web-enabled applications; therefore, database manipulation captures important data vital for a business ROI success. This course is hands-on data acquisitions working with relational databases, enabling the student to effectively analyze the business data. Popular databases use the Structure Query Language (SQL) to write and analyze queries and stored procedures. In this course, the student will learn to apply the basic SQL tools of use of the MS Sequel Server which will prepare the way for more advance topics, such as SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS), Crystal Reports and other business intelligence tools.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: CSC-101, CIS-101 or CIS-206



CIS-236 SQL Fundamentals II (3.00 cr.)
This course is a continuation of the first course SQL Fundamentals I and is intended to provide the student with the detailed study of SQL data manipulations. This is an in-depth hands-on study of the Structured Query Language (SQL) with some integration into Visual Basic. The main emphasis of this will be data management using Transaction SQL, stored procedures, triggers, and scripting using MS Sequel Server Tools. This course is taught in a room with computers running MS Sequel Server System.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: CIS-235, CSC-111; and CSC-101, CIS-101 or CIS-206



CIS-237 Relational Database Concepts (3.00 cr.)
In this course, the student will study the theory of Structured Query Language (SQL) and the Relational Database architecture and technologies. This model and design tools will be exemplified by the use of the MS Sequel Server System and its developer's tools. This course is taught in a room with computers to allow the students benefit by being able to interact with the material, however, there are no graded or mandatory student computer exercises required during the lecture.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: CSC-101, CIS-101 or CIS-206



CIS-238 Database Security and Protection (3.00 cr.)
In the database environment, there are two realms of protection concerns, the database (storage unit) and the server (where the storage unit sits). This course emphasizes an effective understanding of the importance of a business protecting its data. The course will cover hardware, software and human innovations to protect database environments.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: CIS-103; and CSC-101, CIS-101 or CIS-206


College Success

COL-013 Introduction to the American Classroom(1.00 cr.)
This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are beginning to take college-credit bearing courses. The purpose of the course is to acclimate students to the American system of education and develop an understanding of what is expected of them both in and out of the classroom.
Lecture (15.00)
Prerequisites: ESL-023 and ESL-033


Criminal Justice

CRJ-120 Introduction to Homeland Security (3.00 cr.)
This course considers some of the challenges of maintaining the safety and security of citizens, key assets and critical infrastructure in a democratic society. Analyses of past and present efforts to strike a balance between individual rights and the prevention and control of subversive acts and terrorism shall be undertaken.
Lecture (45.00)



CRJ-220 Risk Management and Analysis (3.00 cr.)
This course is a necessary component in the homeland security curriculum. It will develop within the student an awareness of analytical risk management so as to promote better informed decision-making relative to the deployment of limited security resources. By its very nature, the course encourages the use of careful analysis in determining how to best address security related problems.
Lecture (45.00)



CRJ-230 Victimology (3.00 cr.)
Victimology allows students to examine the insight of the overlooked individuals in the criminal justice system, the victim. This course of study comprises of victimsrights when interacting with law enforcement officers, judicial officials and the processes in place to achieve justice for victims. In addition, students will be able to comprehend and understand the following concepts: offender accountability; social and economic impact on victims; and programs available to crime victims.
Lecture (45.00)


Fire Science

FIR-225 Hydraulics (3.00 cr.)
This course covers properties, principles, and concepts of fluid materials. This includes water flows, friction loss, fluid pressures, fluid flows, and various design and capacity considerations of tanks and pumps.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: FIR-101



FIR-235 NJ Fire Officer I (3.00 cr.)
This is a State of New Jersey certification course that requires minimum 45 hour of classroom and practical applications. This course is intended for active firefighters who are or will be placed in supervisory roles as part of their responsibilities. The program follows a mandatory state curriculum that includes class/homework assignments, research projects, quizzes for each chapter, a mid-term, and a final exam. In addition to the final exam, the New Jersey Fire Officer I Certification exam will be administered and graded by the Division of Fire Safety. All course requirements must be met prior to taking the state exam. This program meets the course of instruction requirements of N.J.A.C. 5:73-8, Standards for Fire Service Training and Certification Fire Officers. Successful completion of this course and passing the state administered final exam are required to attain N.J. DFS Fire Officer I Certification.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: FIR-101


Food & Nutrition Science

FNS-107 Nutrition for Health Care Professional (3.00 cr.)
This course evaluates the chemical composition and reaction of the nutrients in food, digestion, absorption and metabolism of Nutrients. The nutritional needs of humans throughout the life cycle including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescences and geriatrics will be explored. Students will learn how cultural influences affect nutrition status and they will learn how to assess and improve nutritional health by completing a computerized diet analysis on their current eating habits. The relationship of diet to health and disease, and the role of nursing professionals and nutrition will be emphasized.
Lecture (45.00)



FNS-221 Quantity Food Production (4.00 cr.)
This course allows students to plan and prepare foods and meals for large groups. Students will learn how to use and convert standard recipes, how to order foods in quantity, and how to assess food safety.
Lecture (30.00)
Laboratory (60.00)
Prerequisites: FNS-210 or HTS-115


Music

MUS-229 Basic Studio Mantenance (3.00 cr.)
Basic Studio Maintenance teaches routine maintenance and trouble-shooting skills for use in a recording studio environment. The class discusses issues of grounding, intermittency, equipment failure and system architecture. It also includes a thorough discussion of computer-related issues such as backup, data recovery, installation and hardware integration.
Lecture (30.00)
Laboratory (30.00)
Prerequisites: MUS-129



MUS-230 Audio Production (3.00 cr.)
Audio Production bridges the world of audio engineering and audio production. It continues to practice fundamental audio recording techniques as well as fine tune critical listening and analytic skills in lab settings. During the course of the semester, students will practice hands-on application of production in conjunction with volunteer artists and bands.
Lecture (30.00)
Laboratory (30.00)
Prerequisites: MUS-134


MUS-231 Mixing Audio (3.00 cr.)
Mixing Audio is a dedicated class to the art and craft of mixing audio productions. This class will approach fundamental mix techniques from styles as diverse as rock, hip-hop, jazz and punk. Because of the nature of mixing being both art and craft; the class will not only approach fundamental uses of various mixing tools, but also aesthetic choice and artistic vision.
Lecture (30.00)
Laboratory (30.00)
Prerequisites: MUS-136



MUS-232 Sound Design (3.00 cr.)
Sound Design acts as both an introduction and practice lab for the art of creating and manipulating sound for film, television and internet accompaniment. The class will cover the logistical aspect of synchronization and scoring as well as advanced mix techniques based around sonic manipulation.
Lecture (30.00)
Laboratory (30.00)
Prerequisites: MUS-134 and MUS-136


MUS-233 Advanced Audio Production and Mixing (3.00 cr.)
Advanced Audio Production and Mixing continues the hands-on exploration of the record production process with an even more detailed hands-on experience. Students will explore more advanced mixing techniques that have evolved in modern music, as well as, participate in a thorough survey of mastering. Mastering will be used collaboratively between students to foster communication skills and critical listening. The class will also shed light on the modern hybrid studio setup and discuss concepts of analog summing, external inserts and combining the digital and analog mediums.
Lecture (30.00)
Laboratory (30.00)
Prerequisites: MUS-230 and MUS-231



MUS-275 Audio Production Internship (3.00 cr.)
Audio Production Internship provides the student with work experience within the recording studio, live sound, broadcast or post production fields. The student, with guidance from a mentoring professor, will find an appropriate internship in his/her chosen field. This unpaid position for the duration of the final spring semester aims to give the student practical experience in their chosen field.
Lecture (45.00)
Prerequisites: MUS-230