Mini-Courses
Courses are offered to community members to enhance their knowledge and to help teachers meet their

professional development requirements.

  • Teachers receive 3 hours of professional development per session, 15 for attendance at all 5 sessions of the series.

  • The courses are $25 each or you may become a member of the Center for $50 and take unlimited courses September 1 to August 31. (Review our refund policy here.)

  • To become a member, download a pdf of the registration form to mail in or call 856-227-7200, ext. 4333.

  • To register for a Mini-Course, download a pdf of the Mini-Course Registration Form  and return the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility
    Connector Building, Room 103
    Blackwood Campus
    200 College Drive
    Blackwood, NJ 08012

  • To register for a course without becoming a member, click the WebAdvisor Access link below.
    1. Click Register and Pay for Continuing Education Classes
    2. Under Topic Code, Choose Center for Civic Leadership
    3. SUBMIT - the courses will then appear for selection

Webadvisor_icon

 



Fall Courses 2015


 

Disney’s America
A Literary Journey through the U.S., Part 1
The Big Three: When Lions Roared

Early Hitchcock
The Campaign and Battle of Gettysburg
The Fabulous Fifties: The Way it Was or the Way we Think it Was
History of Professional Baseball in Philadelphia
The Forgotten Theater: The Western Front in the Civil War
Expedition to the Ancient
Ethics and Technology


 

Disney 

Disney’s America
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-51

INSTRUCTOR: E. O’Connell
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210
TIME: 6:30–9 p.m.
DAY: Mondays

 

This course examines the reciprocal relationship between the work of Walt Disney and American politics, society, and culture. Using Disney’s animated films and theme parks as historical landmarks; we will navigate through the twentieth century, examining the historical factors that shaped Disney’s life and work, as well as the ways in which Disney influenced American’s views of themselves, each other, and culture outside the US. Course includes lecture, film clips, discussion, and suggested readings.

Week 1: 9/28/15
Walt: The Man Behind the Myth

Week 2: 10/5/15
Princesses in the Magic Kingdom

Week 3: 10/12/15
Disney and Race

Week 4: 10/19/15
Theme Parks: The Wonderful Worlds of Disney

Week 5: 10/26/15
The Pixar Revolution

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 literature-journey
A Literary Journey through the U.S., Part 1
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-52

INSTRUCTOR: E. Hernandez

LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 105
TIME: 6:30–9 p.m.
DAY: Tuesdays 

 

This course will explore past and contemporary literary and cultural influences from the New England region of the United States. Class discussions will cover a variety of literary forms and authors as well as regional music, landscape photography, and other art forms. Time will be given to historical events, but the emphasis is on the artists and the people.

Week 1: 9/29/15
Acadia and the Maine Woods
An examination of the northeastern-most part of America from the earliest writings about the land through contemporary writings describing the mysterious forests and rugged coasts of Maine.

Week 2: 10/6/15
Back Roads and Small Towns
An exploration of the towns, forests, and mountains of New England through the authors who lived and wrote there.

Week 3: 10/13/15
Social Class along Coastal Towns
An illumination of the issues of working and surviving along the New England coast as seen in poetry, drama, and fiction.
 

Week 4: 10/20/15
Mill Towns and the Hudson River Valley
An adventure among the upstate settlements of New York through the eyes of early writers and an investigation of contemporary economic changes.

Week 5: 10/27/15
The City that Never Sleeps
A journey down the streets of America’s first capital, from the Gilded Age through the Harlem Renaissance and beyond in poetry, fiction, drama, and song.

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The Big Three: When Lions Roared

bigThree 


COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-53
INSTRUCTOR: R. Voldish
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210
TIME: 6:30–9 p.m.
DAY: Thursdays

Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin; these three leaders made history on a scale so vast that the fate of the
world for centuries to come hung in the balance – as they well knew. This course will explore in detail not just the grand strategies and key decisions that shaped the battlefield; it will also bring to light the political maneuvering, petty jealousies and controversial decisions that still reverberate in the headlines today. We will view portions of the award-winning miniseries World War II: When Lions Roared. As a culminating activity, the class will be encouraged to comment on the correctness and morality of the course decided upon by the president, prime minister, and dictator for each episode.

Week 1: 10/1/15
1941: Preparing for Battle
As Churchill desperately attempts to keep Great Britain in the war – the lone nation contesting German supremacy in Europe – he sees that his only hope lies in involving the United States in the struggle. FDR agrees, but is stymied by an isolationist Congress and an indifferent public. Meanwhile, Hitler’s audacious
invasion of the Soviet Union – Operation Barbarossa – brings unprecedented death and destruction to Stalin’s empire. Lend-Lease, the Atlantic Charter, the lightning German invasion of Russia and the “undeclared war” in the Atlantic are the main topics.

Week 2: 10/8/15
1942: Holding the Line
Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, America is finally “in.” However, American and British forces reel under the hammer-like blows of successive defeats. America declares a “Germany First” policy that angers many within the public and military establishment, especially General George Marshall. In the meantime, the Germans are stopped at Moscow, and it appears that Stalin’s Soviet Union will hold out after all. The Doolittle Raid, Battles of the Coral Sea and Midway, North African invasion, Stalingrad and the American II Corps’ humiliating defeat at Kasserine Pass will be emphasized.

Week 3: 10/15/15
1943: The Turning Point

Churchill enjoys the apex of his influence at the Casablanca Conference as the Axis is driven from North Africa. Yet while the wily prime minister cajoles FDR into an invasion of Sicily to preserve British imperial interests, Stalin is pleading for a “Second Front” in Western Europe to take some of the German pressure off Russia. The invasions of Sicily and Italy, the Combined Bomber Offensive against Germany, the fall of Mussolini and Italy’s exit from the war will be the main topics.

Week 4: 10/22/15

1944: Closing the Ring
While Allied forces continue to be bogged down in Italy, D-Day in France finally arrives, and the Western Allies swiftly drive to the borders of Germany. Meanwhile, as American military preponderance becomes obvious, Churchill feels increasingly marginalized and flies to Moscow to make a deal with Stalin over postwar-Eastern Europe. But Hitler still has a few cards to play: cruise missiles aimed at London and a devastating attack through the Ardennes in Belgium. Soviet advances up to Warsaw, Operation Market Garden and the Battle of the Bulge will be the main focus.
 

Week 5: 10/29/15
1945: Endgame
As Hitler’s Thousand-Year-Reich crumbles, the Big Three’s need for each other crumbles, too. They meet at Yalta in the Crimea to try to decide what to do with Germany – and Poland. Churchill is already in full “Cold War” mode, and even FDR is irked by Soviet moves in Austria and Czechoslovakia. The Yalta Conference, Hitler’s and FDR’s deaths and the beginning of the Cold War are tonight’s focus.

 

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 alfred-hitchcock

Early Hitchcock

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-60
INSTRUCTOR: M. Sorrento
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conf. room 110
TIME: 4–6:30 p.m.
DAY: Mondays  


This course will focus on early career of the Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock. We will screen and discuss his World War II-era spy thrillers, his entries in the crime movie style of film noir, and his experimental thrillers. While treating these works as minor classics in their own right, the course will discuss how the films led to his well-known later classics (Psycho, Vertigo, North by Northwest).


Week 1: 9/28/15
Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
This entry in film noir was one of the director’s personal favorites, and a fitting introduction to the director.


Week 2: 10/5/15
Stranger on a Train (1950)
A tale of “criss cross” murders remains one of the filmmaker’s best treatment of suspense.
 

Week 3: 10/12/15
Lifeboat (1944)
Hitchcock was tempted to film John Steinbeck’s story of survivors of a U-boat bombing in the North Atlantic to see if he could engage the audience for 90 minutes with only one setting. The result is a triumph of direction and film editing.

Week 4: 10/19/15
Rope (1948)
The filmmaker’s other early exercise in “minimal setting” adapts the story of Leopold and Loeb to present a murder plot in “real time” and, through clever staging and editing, the illusion of continual action.

Week 5: 10/26/15
Notorious (1946)
This early classic features Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, and Claude Rains in an espionage plot that includes some of Hitchcock’s most suspenseful and memorable moments.

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 gettysburg-cannon

 

The Campaign and Battle of Gettysburg, June 3–July 14, 1863

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-61
INSTRUCTOR: H. Kaufman
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110
TIME: 4–6:30 p.m.
DAY: Thursdays

We will focus on the correspondence, communications, orders, memoirs and contemporary accounts; we will explore the Campaign and Battle of Gettysburg from its strategic plan, through the Confederate retreat and its aftermath including the history of the creation of the Gettysburg National Military Park. As well as the three days of the battle, the course examines the Southern view and plan for the campaign, the Northern response, and the controversies of the battle and its aftermath.

Week 1: 9/17/15
The Gettysburg Campaign strategy and plan from the Southern perspective; the response of the North; and the initial movements and tactics of the campaign

Week 2: 9/24/15
Gettysburg,Day One: The events leading up to the battle; importance of June 28; controversy of actions of Confederate cavalry

Week 3: 10/1/15
Gettysburg Day Two: Actions of General Sickles, Longstreet’s assault, battles at Culp’s Hill and Cemetery Hill

Week 4: 10/8/15
Gettysburg,Day Three: Union attack at Culp’s Hill; analysis of Pickett, Pettigrew, Trimble attack; cavalry actions

Week 5: 10/15/15
Confederate retreat; Camp Letterman and treatment of the wounded; Meade’s pursuit; political consequences of the battle; creation of the National Military Park


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 50s-kitchen
The Fabulous Fifties: The Way it Was or the Way we Think it Was

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-54
INSTRUCTOR: J. Pesda
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 105
TIME: 2–4:30 p.m.
DAY: Tuesdays


This course will survey the decade by presenting the popular image of the fifties and contrasting it with its factual history. The era is often viewed through a rose colored lenses popularized by films and television but it wasn’t Happy Days for everybody. Documentaries and Hollywood films will be used to highlight the major events of the period.
Week 1: 11/10/15
Better Dead than Red or How We Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb

Week 2: 11/17/15
How We Sold America to Ourselves and the Rest of the World

Week 3: 11/24/15
All We Thought we Needed to Know About Sex but were Afraid to Ask

Week 4: 12/1/15
The Struggle for Human Rights that we Often Didn’t Know was Taking Place

Week 5: 12/8/15
The End of the Era and the Beginning of the Sixties

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 philly-baseball
 

History of Professional Baseball in Philadelphia

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-55
INSTRUCTOR: J. Love
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 105
TIME: 6:30–9 p.m.
DAY: Tuesdays

This course will discuss the history of both the Philadelphia Phillies and Athletics. Classes will talk about some of the true legends of the game including Connie Mack, Lefty Grove, Richie Ashburn, Dick Allen and Mike Schmidt. What does the future hold for professional baseball in Philadelphia?


Week 1: 11/10/15
Philadelphia Phillies and Athletics
The first half of the 20th Century, Philadelphia was the host of two professional MLB teams. This class will discuss their origins, players, and championships

Week 2: 11/17/15
Legendary Players in Philadelphia
Some great players came through Philadelphia: These players include “Shoeless Joe Jackson, Napoleon Lajoie, Lefty Grove, Eddie Plank, Dick Allen, Steve Carlton, Mike Schmidt, Joe Morgan, and Pete Rose.

Week 3: 11/24/15
Philadelphia Ballparks
We will discuss Columbia Park, Shibe Park/Connie Mack Stadium, Baker Bowl, Veterans Stadium, and Citizens Bank Park.

Week 4: 12/1/15
Non-Players Who Influenced Baseball in Philadelphia
Connie Mack, By Saam, Harry Kalas, Dallas Green, Charlie Manuel, Chris Wheeler, Larry Anderson and Tom Burgoyne

Week 5: 12/8/15
The Future of Baseball in Philadelphia
Is Philadelphia more of a football town? What Phillies will be inducted into the Hall of Fame? Does the future include Ken Giles, Maikel Franco and Aaron Nola?

 

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western-front 
The Forgotten Theater: The Western Front in the Civil War

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-56
INSTRUCTOR: R. Baumgartner
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210
TIME: 4–6:30 p.m.
DAY: Thursdays

In this course we discuss the Western Front of the American Civil War.

Week 1: 11/5/15
The Creation of Grant: Fort Donelson to Shiloh

Week 2: 11/12/15
Sherman’s Proving Grounds: Vicksburg

Week 3: 11/19/15
Border Ruffians: Quantrill’s Raiders

 


Week 4: 12/3/15
Damn The Torpedoes! Mobile Bay and Naval  Operations

Week 5: 12/10/15
The State Fight: Chattanooga and Chickamauga

 

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 Ur_Mesopotamia
Expedition to the Ancient Mediterranean

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-65
INSTRUCTOR: J. Okun
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110
TIME: 9:30–Noon
DAY: Saturdays
NOTE: NO CLASS 11/28, 12/12

Pack your bags bring a compass as we time travel to the fascinating ancient worlds of the Mediterranean. Through a combined geographic and cultural approach, we will investigate how these civilizations contributed to the development of the western world. Our expedition will make stops in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Phoenicia, the Greek city-states, Persia and Rome as we embark on our voyage of discovery.

Week 1: 11/7/15
Why Mesopotamia?
What were the geographic and environmental conditions which made the ‘Land Between the Rivers’ the ideal location for a shift from hunting to farming? What type of settlements and cultures evolved? What were the major innovations which the people of Mesopotamia developed?

Week 2: 11/14/15
Egypt and the Nile
How did Egypt’s geographic characteristics lead to this unique and long-lasting civilization? How did the Nile influence culture, public health and outlook? How did interactions with neighboring cultures affect its development?

Week 3: 11/21/15
The Rise of the Iron Age
What tumultuous changes took place in approximately 1200 BCE which led to a great shift in religious beliefs, technology, kingdoms and empires? We’ll explore the Mycenae, Minoa, Israel, Phoenicia and Assyria.

Week 4: 12/5/15
The Greek Peninsula
What led to the emergence of the Greek city-states? How did Athens form the basis of much of what we consider the beginnings of western thought, art, and culture? How did the Greeks perceive and interact with the Persian Empire?

Week 5: 12/19/15
Rome-from Republic to Empire
How did a small group of farmers in mid-Italy plant the seeds of most powerful civilization of the ancient world? Who were the Romans and how did beliefs and culture develop? How are Rome’s technological, religious, linguistic, and political reverberations still felt strongly today?

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 drone

Ethics and Technology

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-62
INSTRUCTOR: S. Rosenson
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110
TIME: 4–6:30 p.m.
DAY: Thursdays
NOTE: NO CLASS 11/26/15

We live in an age of ever-advancing technology, and new technologies present new ethical issues. In this course we will discuss military technology, privacy issues presented by various technologies, the ethical obligations engineers have when designing new products, and other topics.
 

Week 1: 11/5/15
Engineering Ethics:Table Saws and the Ford Pinto

Week 2: 11/12/15
Military Technology: How Modern Technology has Changed the Conduct of War

Week 3: 11/19/15
Military Technology: Robots, Drones and Medicalized Weapons

Week 4: 12/3/15
Privacy and Technology: Constitutional Issues, Thermal Imaging Devices, and GPS Trackers

Week 5: 12/10/15
Data Mining: How Social Networks and others use your Personal Data


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