Mini-Courses
Courses are offered to community members to enhance their knowledge and to help teachers meet their

professional development requirements.

  • Teachers receive 3 hours of professional development per session, 15 for attendance at all 5 sessions of the series.

  • The courses are $25 each or you may become a member of the Center for $50 and take unlimited courses September 1 to August 31. (Review our refund policy here.)

  • To become a member, download a pdf of the registration form to mail in or contact Barbara Palmer at bpalmer@camdencc.edu or 856-227-7200, ext. 4333.

  • To register for a Special Event, download a pdf of the Special Event Registration Form and return to Barbara Palmer at bpalmer@camdencc.edu or 856-227-7200, ext. 4333.

  • To register for a course without becoming a member, click the WebAdvisor Access link below.
    1. Click Register and Pay for Continuing Education Classes
    2. Under Topic Code, Choose Center for Civic Leadership
    3. SUBMIT - the courses will then appear for selection

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Summer Courses 2014



IDY-209-51From Lenin to Gorbachev: The Rise and Fall of Soviet Communism
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-51
INSTRUCTOR: J. Pesda
DAY: Tuesdays
TIME: 2 to 4:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


This course will trace the rise of Marxism in Russia from the early 20th Century to its collapse in 1991. It begins with the events leading to the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 and ends with the collapse of the Soviet Union.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/17/14
    Road to Revolution

  • Week 2: 6/24/14
    From the New Economic Policy to the Five Year Plans and the Great Terror

  • Week 3: 7/1/14
    The Horrors of World War II and the Beginning of the Cold War

  • Week 4: 7/8/14
    Khrushchev and the "Thaw" to Brezhnev and Decline

  • Week 5: 7/15/14
    Final Efforts to Preserve the System


IDY-209-52Almost President:
Five Men Who Lost the Race but Changed America
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-52
INSTRUCTOR: R. Voldish
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 4 to 6:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


Winning may be the only thing, but there have been "losers" in past presidential elections whose impact on American politics and culture far outlived their losses and sometimes the achievements of the "winners." This course will take a thoughtful look at candidates, often reviled in their time, who were able to give voice to issues whose time had not yet come or forge realignments of the electorate which would benefit others. The candidates have been chosen for their unique contributions to American society at different stages of our development. Historical videos will supplement the class discussions.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/16/14
    Henry Clay: Lincoln's Idol

  • Week 2: 6/23/14
    William Jennings Bryan: Voice of the Common Man

  • Week 3: 6/30/14
    Al Smith: The Man Who Made Catholics Americans

  • Week 4: 7/7/14
    Barry Goldwater: Harbinger of the Reagan Revolution

  • Week 5: 7/14/14
    George McGovern: Slayer of the Political Bosses


IDY-209-53The Development of Roller Derby and its Role in the Empowerment of Women
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-53
INSTRUCTOR: T. Crowthers
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


Roller derby has been an evolving sport since 1932. It has become a sport that symbolizes the empowerment of women and community service. While battling society on the views of "normal," roller derby accepts the cultures and backgrounds of all people. The focus of this course will be the evolution of the sport over the years and the empowerment of women within the sport.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/16/14
    The History of Roller Derby: Great Depression to Present Day Beginning as early as 1932, roller derby has been a long standing, yet constantly changing sport. We will discuss the journey roller derby has taken throughout history to become the sport it is today.

  • Week 2: 6/23/14
    Women, Feminism, Opportunity and Physical Activity Throughout the Years of Roller Derby Transcending from the normal feminist models, roller derby has been considered a third wave feminist model sport due to the number of women that take part, the bonds and relationships that develop, the physical appearance and mentality of the women that participate. We will discuss how women have risen in the sport of roller derby throughout the years.

  • Week 3: 6/30/14
    Roller Derby's Battle Against the Grain of Society: Acceptance of all Minorities, Cultures and Groups As a third wave feminist model sport, roller derby has been greatly noted to be a sport of acceptance; including women of all sizes, shapes, races and sexual orientation. This fact, along with the controversy it has engendered, will be discussed.

  • Week 4: 7/7/14
    Famous and Successful Women in Roller Derby: Their Successes, Failures and Lessons Learned Women have become successful due to the sport of roller derby and its varying connections. We will discuss the WFTDA (Women's Flat Track Derby Association) and the women who created it.

  • Week 5: 7/14/14
    The Derby World Today: Culture, Rules and Practices Today, roller derby has become its own entity and culture. We will discuss how roller derby has changed the lives of and empowered the individuals who play. Members from the Atlantic Coast Roller Girls will be available to discuss the rules and regulations of the WFTDA and answer any questions you may have about the sport today.


IDY-209-54From The Salem Witch Craze to the Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-54
INSTRUCTOR: R. Lorenzi
DAY: Tuesdays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


In 1692 colonial Salem Village, a Puritan community, nineteen people were hanged for practicing witchcraft; many sentenced by John Hathorne, the great-great grandfather of the famous19th Century famous writer Nathaniel Hawthorne. We will study how Hawthorne's heritage influenced his writing.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/17/14
    The Salem Witch Craze
    We will look at some events of late 17th Century Salem.

  • Week 2: 6/24/14
    Hawthorne's Stories of Secret Sin
    "Young Goodman Brown," "The Minister's Black Veil," and "Roger Malvin's Burial"

  • Week 3: 7/1/14
    Hawthorne's Distrust of Science and Revolution
    "Rappaccini's Daughter," "The Birthmark," and "My Kinsman's, Major Molineux"

  • Week 4: 7/8/14
    Hawthorne's Masterpiece
    "The Scarlet Letter"

  • Week 5: 7/15/14
    What Has Become of Puritan Salem?
    "The House of the Seven Gables"


IDY-209-55Biomedical Ethics and the Law
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-55
INSTRUCTOR: T. Collins
DAY: Wednesdays
TIME: 4 to 6:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


We will study specific Biomedical Ethical issues and the law. How do moral principles and beliefs influence specific state and federal laws regarding biomedicine? How do practical issues of enforcement influence the law's attempt to be a reflection of morality?

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/18/14
    Abortion and the Law
    Exploring how abortion law is practiced federally and on the state level. In addition, what are the philosophical principles that guide particular laws regarding abortion?

  • Week 2: 6/25/14
    Euthanasia and the Law
    How do specific state and federal statutes influence end-of-life issues?

  • Week 3: 7/2/14
    Patient Rights and the Law
    How are patient rights affected by specific state and federal laws? How did the landmark 1990 Nancy Cruzan Supreme Court ruling affect the so-called "right to die?" How are POLST laws affecting patients?

  • Week 4: 7/9/14
    Organ Donation and Allocation and the Law
    What type of organ donation system should we have? How is organ donation status determined in present practice?

  • Week 5: 7/16/14
    Genetic Testing and the Law
    What type of rights do patients have to keep personal genetic information private? What type of moral obligations do we have to seek genetic information to better future generations?


IDY-209-56Brother Fighting Brother: Five Civil War Battles and Their Tales
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-56
INSTRUCTOR: R. Baumgartner
DAY: Thursdays (Note: No class 7/3)
TIME: 4 to 6:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


In this course we will discuss different Civil War battles and the personalities involved in those particular battles.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/19/14
    The Victory that Could Have Been: Antietam/Sharpsburg

  • Week 2: 6/26/14
    Bridging the Gap: Fredericksburg

  • Week 3: 7/10/14
    High Water Mark: Gettysburg

  • Week 4: 7/17/14
    Marching Through Georgia: Atlanta and Sherman's March

  • Week 5: 7/24/14
    The Final Straw: Richmond


IDY-209-57The Art of Women: Inspiration & Style
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-57
INSTRUCTOR: D. Smith
DAY: Thursdays (Note: No class 7/3)
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


We will take a look back at women who were empowered through art and the creative process. This course will focus on historical works by artists who broke boundaries for the women of the 20th Century. The influence of these women serves as an inspiration to others who are driven to express themselves through art.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/19/14
    Historical Perspectives-Cultural Differences
    In the Early 1800s there were very few places to take classes and/or exhibit their works but, there were women who were an exception to the rule. Violet Oakley, Mary Cassatt and others inspired artists of the early 20th Century. We will discuss the early education of women in art and introduce the perspective of the "self taught" artist.

  • Week 2: 6/26/14
    Women of the 20th Century/The Journey
    What inspires an artist to create? We will look at a few female painters of this time who are practicing artists and also women from the recent past who left a lasting impression on the women of today.

  • Week 3: 7/10/14
    The 3rd Dimension: Sculpture & Ceramic Art
    We will discuss artists such as Selma Burke who was inspired to follow her dream by the bright red orange of clay in Georgia, and Judy Chicago who chose to honor other women through "The Dinner Party." We will highlight artists such as African-American artist Elizabeth Catlett and Inge Hardison (100 years old).

  • Week 4: 7/17/14
    Murals Paint & Stained Glass
    We will look at the planning process of creating a stained glass mural such as those by Violet Oakley. We will view murals and stained glass windows created by female artists. Philadelphia's Mural Arts Program which will be highlighted has produced thousands of murals using the computer as a planning tool.

  • Week 5: 7/24/14
    Nature & Abstraction: Artists of Today
    Artist Diane Burko paints the environment and hopes to preserve the spirit of these disappearing places on her canvas. Artist Emily Brown paints nature that captures her attention while Barbara Takenaga expresses that which flows "from the inside out" as she paints and it radiates from her canvas. In this final session we will include a few contemporary non-representational and representational pieces of art.


IDY-209-65Westward Ho! – Adventures in the American West
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-65
INSTRUCTOR: J. Okun
DAY: Tuesdays (Note: No class 7/3)
TIME: 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110


Armchair travelers, seasoned adventurers and those who are simply curious about the magnificent American West – join us on a 2,000 mile journey in which we will examine this iconic land through a geographic, historical and environmental lens through lively discussion and slide presentations.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/17/14
    Westward Bound
    We will prepare for our journey by investigating what the west means to our culture and learn about some of the people, places and events which shaped the land.

  • Week 2: 6/24/14
    Redrock Country
    The first leg of our expedition begins in Salt Lake City and continues onward to the awe-inspiring natural lands of southern Utah and northern Arizona. Ancient peoples, tourism, the Grand Canyon and water resources will be some of our topics.

  • Week 3: 7/1/14
    Desert Lands
    We will visit some of the wildest, yet fastest growing areas in the west. Dams, Death Valley, ghost towns and the Eastern Sierras are some of our highlights.

  • Week 4: 7/8/14
    Traveler’s Tales
    Exploring Utah through the words of the Donner Party, the Mormon migrants and Spanish explorers will give us a glimpse of this extraordinary place. Topics include the Great Ice Age, the Great Salt Lake and the Pony Express.

  • Week 5: 7/15/14
    Mountains Majesty
    From Idaho’s Craters of the Moon to Yellowstone, we will focus on volcanoes, Native Americans, The Lewis and Clark Expedition, archeology and some of our most dramatic national parks.


IDY-209-66Understanding Genocide: A Study in Human Behavior
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-66
INSTRUCTOR: D. Bannon
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110


To date, the efforts to end genocide have not proven successful. This course will examine the common threads that allow genocide to persist into the 21st Century and the failure of humanity to put an end to it.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/16/14
    Hatred, Bias and the Potential for Mass Murder
    An attempt to understand how the steps to genocide are planned and implemented without global intervention to protect the innocent

  • Week 2: 6/23/14
    The Aftermath of the Holocaust
    Understanding how something of this magnitude could occur

  • Week 3: 6/30/14
    The Rwandan Genocide
    How the seeds of hatred set the stage for inconceivable brutality

  • Week 4: 7/7/14
    The Genocide of Darfur, Sudan
    Elimination of a group as the world watches

  • Week 5: 7/14/14
    The Genocide Convention and the U.N.
    Whose job is it to protect international human rights?


IDY-209-67Shakespeare Goes Hollywood
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-67
INSTRUCTOR: P. Woodworth
DAY:Tuesdays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110


We will examine some of Shakespeare's most enduring classics and how they have been interpreted in film. We will emphasize the decisions made by filmmakers and how they reflect differing interpretations of the play in question. Each session will include a refresher course on the plays discussed, making it perfect for newcomers and Shakespeare veterans alike.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/17/14
    The Play's the Thing
    We will look at the original performance context of Shakespeare's plays – how the performances differ from our modern productions, what the audiences were like and what they expected and other curious factors. A must for anyone who has ever wondered what it was really like to see these plays back in the Bard's day.

  • Week 2: 6/24/14
    Shakespeare on Love
    We will look at film interpretations of two classic tales of love, jealousy and violence – "Romeo & Juliet" and "Othello" – as well as how changing cultural contexts have influenced their depictions.

  • Week 3: 7/1/14
    The Scottish Play
    One of Shakespeare's strangest and bloodiest tales, the Scottish play has been interpreted a number of times over the years and is one of the most widely – and imaginatively – adapted plays on film.

  • Week 4: 7/8/14
    To Be, Or Not to Be
    As what is arguably Shakespeare's greatest play, it's no surprise "Hamlet" has been the subject of many film interpretations. It may surprise you to see just how differently it has been re-imagined in each generation.

  • Week 5: 7/15/14
    Bardic Knowledge
    A selection of short scenes and interpretations from different plays, as well as commentaries on upcoming productions and how changing media are leading to evolving views on Shakespeare's cannon as well.


IDY-209-68"Why Do We…."
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-68
INSTRUCTOR: T. DelGiorno, Jr., M.D.
DAY:Thursdays (Note no class 7/3)
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110


We will discuss Evolution's answers to all those questions we have that begin with… "Why Do We…" The instructor will offer over 200 "Why Do We…" questions and answer them with a foot in our evolutionary past and the other in current day physiology. He will subdivide the topics according to five organ systems with considerable time during the final class to answer attendees queries.

 

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Dates and Topics

  • Week 1: 6/19/14
    Neurology
    Why do we sleep, dream, blink, cry, have seizures, headaches, migraines, dizziness, faint, have strokes/TIAs, get Parkinson's or MS, get addicted (both good & bad addictions), pinched nerves, carpal tunnel, electric shock when we hit our "crazy bone," etc.

  • Week 2: 6/26/14
    Pulmonary
    Why do we have asthma, allergies, cough, sneeze, snore, breathe fast or slow, die from carbon monoxide poisoning, get mountain sickness or hold our breath when anxious, etc.

  • Week 3: 7/10/14
    Cardiac/Digestive
    Why do we get heart attacks, have high blood pressure, have rhythm problems, have a rapid pulse, die from shoveling snow, why do we have gas, heartburn, reflux, vomit, get nauseous, get fat, get diabetes, have colitis, intestinal cancer, get gastric bypass surgery, etc.

  • Week 4: 7/17/14
    Reproductive
    Why do we need so many sperm or eggs, why do we get tubal pregnancies, hernias, "shrinkage," need Viagra, why do we experience menopause, episiotomy, circumcision, nocturnal erections/ emissions, average 7 minute intercourse (longer than almost every animal!), why do we have same sex attractions, etc.?

  • Week 5: 7/24/14
    Audience Queries