Mini-Courses
Courses are offered to community members to enhance their knowledge and to help teachers meet their

professional development requirements.

  • Teachers receive 3 hours of professional development per session, 15 for attendance at all 5 sessions of the series.

  • The courses are $25 each or you may become a member of the Center for $50 and take unlimited courses September 1 to August 31. (Review our refund policy here.)

  • To become a member, download a pdf of the registration form to mail in or contact Barbara Palmer at bpalmer@camdencc.edu or 856-227-7200, ext. 4333.

  • To register for a Special Event, download a pdf of the Special Event Registration Form and return to Barbara Palmer at bpalmer@camdencc.edu or 856-227-7200, ext. 4333.

  • To register for a course without becoming a member, click the WebAdvisor Access link below.
    1. Click Register and Pay for Continuing Education Classes
    2. Under Topic Code, Choose Center for Civic Leadership
    3. SUBMIT - the courses will then appear for selection

Webadvisor_icon

 



Fall Courses 2014


AmRenaissanceThe American Renaissance (1830–1860)
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-50
INSTRUCTOR: R. Lorenzi
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 6:30–9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


The blossoming of philosophy and literature in the mid-19th century in America caused scholars and historians to label the era The American Renaissance. We will explore the era through the writings of prominent literary figures.

DATES & TOPICS

Week 1: 9/29/14

Transcendentalism
An intellectual movement centered in Concord, Massachusetts, that challenged popular thinking Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau became the two most famous Transcendentalists.

 

Week 2: 10/6/14

Walden
Thoreau’s famous work demonstrated his transcendental beliefs through his two-year experiment of independent living.

 

Week 3: 10/13/14

Uncle Tom’s Cabin
We will discuss Harriet Beecher Stowe’s bestselling novel that urged President Lincoln to refer to her as the little lady who started the war.    

 

Week 4: 10/20/14

Nathaniel Hawthrone
Hawthorne, arguably the greatest American fiction writer of the 19th century, his “Scarlet Letter”, “House of the Seven Gables”, “Young Goodman Brown” and “The Minister’s Black Veil” challenged his Puritan heritage.

 

Week 5: 10/27/14

Herman Melville
Many say Herman Melville is the author of the greatest American novel ‘Moby Dick”. Despite his posthumous fame, Melville died a little-know writer.

 

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egyptSecrets from the Sands of Ancient Egypt
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-51
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. S. Phillips
DAY: Tuesdays
TIME: 6:30–9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 105, Blackwood Campus


This course examines ancient Egyptian history and civilization from the perspective of anthropology. Lectures are based on anthropological and archaeological data from the instructor’s own research in Egypt and elsewhere.

DATES & TOPICS
Week 1: 9/30/14

“1,000 Miles Down the Nile: History of Ancient Egypt”
This session takes the class on a nearly 1,000 mile journey down the Nile River, from Abu Simbel to Alexandria, with images of major sites forming the background of a survey of some 3,000 years of ancient Egyptian history.

 

Week 2: 10/7/14

“Egypt Before the Pyramids”
This session examines in depth one of the less familiar ancient Egyptian time periods: The Predynastic. A rich treasure trove of artifacts exists from this period that tell us much about the life and times of a distant ancient Egypt, a time when kingship and complex society first arose, roughly a thousand years before the first pyramids were ever built.


Week 3: 10/14/14

“Daily Life and Food in Ancient Egypt”
Most of what is known of daily life and food in ancient Egypt derives from funerary contexts such as cemeteries and tombs, as well as temple contexts. Much is known, however, which enables us to reconstruct, from the archaeological data, what it was like to actually be an ancient Egyptian.

 

Week 4: 10/21/14

“Death on the Nile”
Death is a natural part of life shared by all humans, ancient and modern and the ways by which humans deal with death is as varied as humans themselves. This session traces the development of ancient Egyptian private and royal funerary practices through time.

 

Week 5: 10/28/14

“Everywhere the Glint of Gold”
This session examines in detail one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time, the tomb of Tutankhamun. We retrace the historical events that led to the discovery, learn about the life of its discoverer, Howard Carter, and then we examine and “translate,” the dazzling array of treasures the tomb contained.

 

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Downton AbbeyDownton Abbey and the Jazz Age
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-52
INSTRUCTOR: E. Hernandez
DAY: Thursdays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


Participants will explore the character and plots of the PBS series Downton Abbey in the historical context of the 1920s, with its post-World War I changes, increased modernization and influence of American music and culture.

DATES & TOPICS
Week 1: 10/2/14

Death and Taxes
Characters adjust to the death of Matthew Crawley and face economic woes threatening the future of their country estate.    

 

Week 2: 10/9/14

Pride and Prejudice
Younger characters are drawn to the glamorous nightclubs and London literary scene and with these new interests come remarkable changes to their carefully crafted social structure.

 

Week 3: 10/16/14

Suffering and Suffragettes
Downton Abbey’s women face their complex circumstances with courage and march forward into a new era of both oppression and advancement.    

 

Week 4: 10/23/14

Common Ground
Alliances are forged between unlikely partners.

 

Week 5: 10/30/14

Suitors and Scandals
Three widows are pursued, a young woman makes her debut, the Prince of Wales is put on the spot and an American contingent flees the Tea Pot Dome scandal.

 

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americancivilwarStories of the People: The Civil War Experience
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-65
INSTRUCTOR: R. Baumgartner
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference, room 110
NOTE: No class on October 20, 2014


We will discuss different aspects of the Civil War as experienced by individuals.

DATES & TOPICS:
Week 1: 9/29/14

Growing Unrest: Correspondence between Northerners and Southerners of the Civil War

 

Week 2: 10/6/14

The Webbed Feet: Civil War Navy

 

Week 3: 10/13/14

The Fire of Hell: Civil War Artillery

 

Week 4: 10/27/14

Extra! Extra! Civil War Newspapers

 

Week 5: 11/3/14

You Should’ve Seen it in Color: Civil War Photography

 

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iran mapHistory of Iran: Ancient Civilization to Modern Theocracy
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-53
INSTRUCTOR: J. Pesda
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 2 to 4:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


This course will trace the history of Iran from the ancient Persian Empire and subsequent civilizations to modern era. It will consider the rise and fall of empires in Iran and their contacts with the West along with its colonial experience under European imperial powers. Finally, it will conclude with the post-World War II history of Iran under the Shah, the revolution which brought him down, the establishment and evolution of the Islamic Republic of Iran and US Iranian relations since 1979. Jack Pesda, as one of the few Americans to visit Iran since the revolution, will draw upon his experiences to discuss current developments and their impact on the world. He will also be sharing with the class contemporary slides of Iranian society.

DATES & TOPICS:
Week 1: 11/10/14

The Persian Empire


Week 2: 11/17/14

Persian Engagement of the Western World

   
Week 3: 11/24/14

The Iranian Colonia Experience and its Consequences    


Week 4: 12/1/14

Shah Pahlavi, the US and the Revolution of 1979


Week 5: 12/8/14   

The Evolution of the Islamic Republic and its Relations with the U.S.

 

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baseballFrom Base Ball to Baseball: the History of America's Pastime
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-54
INSTRUCTOR: J. Love
DAY: Mondays
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


This course will discuss how baseball has become part of the fabric of American history. Baseball has been referred to as “America’s Pastime” since the 1850s. The sport was originally know as Base Ball and has come a long way since its early days. However, the game has remained essentially unchanged. The rules such as three strikes for a batter and three outs for an inning have been around for more than 150 years. The Philadelphia Phillies have been playing in the same city with the same name since 1883.  

DATES & TOPICS:
Week 1: 11/10/14

Origin of the Game
The early days of base ball meant no gloves, no Sunday games, a pitcher’s box and “dead ball.” Charles Radbourne’s 60 wins as a pitcher in 1884 is a record that will never be broken. Early players often looked to the game as an escape from the coal mines, factory or life on a farm.

 

Week 2: 11/17/14

Beginning of the Modern Era
Baseball in the early 1900s saw such players as Napoleon Lajoie, Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb and Walter Johnson. The Black Sox Scandal of 1919 nearly ruined the integrity of the game. Murders Row was not made up of gangsters but rather a New York Yankees lineup that won the American League Pennant by 19 games and swept the Pirates in the World Series.

 

Week 3: 11/24/14

1930s-1950s Baseball’s Golden Age
Brooklyn Dodgers move to Los Angeles. Jackie Robinson is a pioneer of the game. Players such as Ted Williams, Hank Greenberg and Bob Feller head off to serve in the military. Vin Scully begins his career in 1950 as a broadcaster for the Dodgers and still calls games today. Bobby Thompson hits a homerun and the giants win the Pennant.    

 

Week 4: 12/1/14

1960s-2000 The Rise of Free Agency
How did Curt Flood change baseball? Roger Maris and 1961, Hank Aaron and Pete Rose break historic records. Dock Ellis throws no-hitter while under the influence of LSD. Players go on strike and World Series is cancelled. Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire help restore baseball’s popularity but at what cost?

 

Week 5: 12/8/14

Baseball Today and its Future
The influence of players from Latin America and Japan; Montreal says goodbye to the Expos. Steve Bartman and the curse of the Chicago Cubs. The Phillies become the first professional sports team to lose 10,000 games. Is Millville’s Mike Trout the new Mickey Mantle? What does the future hold for baseball in America?

 

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vietnamVietnam
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-55
INSTRUCTOR: E. Dwyer
DAY: Tuesdays
TIME: 4 to 6:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 105, Blackwood Campus


This course examines, closely, all the key aspects of the Vietnam War. We will compare and contrast the Vietnam War with other American wars, past and present.

DATES & TOPICS
Week 1: 11/11/14   

Historical Background: Prelude and Run-up to War


Week 2: 11/18/14   

Strategic (Big Picture) Political Considerations


Week 3: 11/25/14  

Strategic (Big Picture) Military Considerations


Week 4: 12/2/14     

Tactical (Small-Unit Level) Considerations and Operational Conduct of War

    
Week 5: 12/9/14   

The Home Front: Protests and Peace Treaty

 

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sopranosThe Sopranos: New Jersey's First Family
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-56
INSTRUCTOR: R. Voldish
DAY: Thursdays (no class 11/27/14)
TIME: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
LOCATION: Madison Hall, room 210, Blackwood Campus


When the HBO series The Sopranos debuted on January 10, 1999, it attained instant, international cult status. Its slick production values, thoughtful scripts, topical issues, hip musical score, plots and dialogue that on occasion could approach Shakespeare and seductive and charismatic characters have given it a well-deserved fame base. This course will examine its primary themes and try to explain the reasons for its ever-growing popularity. The discussion for each class will be built around a particular theme and feature excerpts from one or two episodes.

DATES & TOPICS:
Week 1: 11/13/14

“Got myself a gun”
Theft, murder and other assorted violent tendencies will be the topic. We will examine not only the acts of violence, but the pangs of guilt they invariably leave in the murderers’ minds. We will also discuss the role religion plays in easing guilty consciences.


Week 2: 11/20/14    

“This thing of ours”
Does the series perpetuate or subvert stereotypes of Italian Americans? How the family views itself and how outsiders view the Italian American traditions.


Week 3: 12/4/14    

“These guys are living in another century”
Like Archie Bunker, the men of the family abhor social change. It endangers all the mores that they grew up with and venerate. The knowledge that someone is seeing a psychologist or dating interracially can cause an existential breakdown.


Week 4: 12/11/14    

“Whatever happened to the strong, silent type?”
An exploration of the recurring themes of both manhood and femininity and the search for the male ideal, forever threatened by the independent female, appears in almost every episode.


Week 5: 12/18/14    

“All Caucasians look alike”
This class will examine ideas of race and ethnic identity. Particular attention will be paid to the family’s sense of being threatened by the “other,” whether Russian, African American or Native American. From Columbus to Gary Cooper, the family members vainly search for the Lost, White Father.

 

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earthExpedition Earth
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-67
INSTRUCTOR: J. Okun
DAY: Saturdays
TIME: 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, room 106B


Through a combined historical and geographic approach, we will explore a variety of fascinating human and natural phenomena throughout the globe. Our destinations will be as varied as the topics that we investigate through lively discussion and slide presentations.

DATES & TOPICS
Week 1: 11/15/14   

On the Move
Migration has been a constant in the human story. We will look at migration patterns from the Great Ice Age to the overland trails of the west and investigate present migration issues as well.


Week 2: 11/22/14   

A Myriad of Faiths
Religion is a defining factor of culture. We will explore issues in destinations as varied as India, Africa and Western Europe. 

 
Week 3: 12/6/14   

The Staple of Life
How did agriculture emerge thousands of years ago and how did it affect human societies? We will explore the significance and variety of agricultural practices and their effects on culture, economy and population.


Week 4: 12/13/14    

The Power of Industry
What were the seeds of the Industrial Revolution and how did it catapult us into the modern age? How did industry develop in the U.S.? Let’s explore varied places including the Great Lakes, London and China. We will examine the fascinating story of industry and its impact on human societies and economic development.


Week 5: 12/20/14   

Energy and Natural Resources
Issues regarding energy sources, water and resource conservation will be examined as we explore North Dakota, the Colorado River, Yellowstone National Park and many varied places.

 

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shakespeareShakespeare's Ghosts
COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-68
INSTRUCTOR: R. Lorenzi
DAY: Tuesdays (no class 12/9/14)
TIME: 1 to 3:30 p.m.
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110


The beliefs in ghosts and witchcraft were common in Shakespeare’s time. We will see how the Bard put those beliefs to use in some of his greatest plays.

DATES & TOPICS
Week 1: 11/11/14    

Elizabethan beliefs in the supernatural during Queen Elizabeth’s time
The beliefs in ghosts and witches were commonplace.   

 

Week 2: 11/18/14   

Richard III- Despair and die
The night before the Battle of Bosworth, King Richard is visited by the ghosts of his murdered victims.


Week 3: 11/25/14   

Julius Caesar-Et tu, Brute
The ghost of the assassinated Julius Caesar appears to Brutus before battle.

 

Week 4: 12/2/14   

Hamlet-Murder most foul
The most famous ghost in all of Shakespeare, King Hamlet returns from the dead to tell of his murder. He asks his son Prince Hamlet to avenge the Murder.

   
Week 5: 12/16/14   

Macbeth-Fair is foul: foul is fair
Witches appear to Macbeth to inform him that someday he will be king.

 

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housedividedA House Divided: Sectionalism Leading to War

COURSE NUMBER: IDY-209-69
INSTRUCTOR: R. Baumgartner  
LOCATION: Rohrer Center, Executive Conference room 110
TIME: 4 to 6:30 p.m.
DAY: Thursdays (no class 11/27/14)

This course will examine how the Sectionalism crisis during the Antebellum years in the United States ultimately led to secession.

DATES & TOPICS
Week 1: 11/13/14    

An Agreement for All: Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise


Week 2: 11/20/14   

A Tangled Web: Radical Abolitionists and Non-Radical Abolitionist  

 
Week 3: 12/4/14   

Political Change: The Great Compromise and the Kansas-Nebraska Act    

 

Week 4: 12/11/14    

David V. Goliath: The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

   
Week 5: 12/18/14   

The All- Spark: The Election of Lincoln

 

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